Preatreatment Agents for increased performance and quality

Automotive aftermarket applications are an important field for Sika, to allow a durable and long-lasting performance in the automotive field. Among the product systems developed by Sika for the use in the automotive repair and replacement industry are sealing, bonding, dampening and protecting solutions.

For glass replacement, pre-treatment agents such as Sika® Aktivator PRO aim to simplify the application and to increase the work performance and quality. Sika® Aktivator PRO is a transparent bonding agent for automotive glass bonding with ceramic coating and polyurethane adhesive.

The large application temperature range in combination with the short flash-off time makes it an all-year-round product, ideal for mobile or in-house applications.

To show the environmental benefits from using Sika® Aktivator PRO compared to a more common black primer, a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of the two products for the same application was made. The LCA is from cradle to gate, which means the LCA investigates the potential environmental impact of the products from raw material extraction to finished production.

Cumulative Energy Demand
yes
Cumulative Energy Demand (CED)

In terms of CED, Sika® Aktivator PRO has a lower cradle to gate energy demand per kilogram and per functional unit (the amount of Sika® Aktivator PRO needed is about half that of the black primer). The net gains from using the Sika® Aktivator PRO could reach up to up to 3 TJ per year.

 

Global Warming Potential
yes
Global Warming Potential (GWP)

In terms of GWP, Sika® Aktivator PRO has a lower cradle to gate carbon footprint per kg and per functional unit (the amount of Sika® Aktivator PRO needed is about half that of the black primer). The net gains from using the Sika® Aktivator PRO could reach up to 160 tons CO₂-eq. per year.

Less energy resources

To illustrate the gains from using Sika® Aktivator PRO instead of a more common black primer for windscreen surfaces handled yearly (approximately 12 million), the Cumulative Energy Demand (CED) and the Global Warming Potential (GWP) are shown below.

CED accounts for the consumption of energy resources, namely the total amount of primary energy from renewable and non-renewable resources.

GWP measures the potential contribution to Climate Change, focusing on emissions of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO₂), which enhance the heat radiation absorption of the atmosphere, causing the temperature at the earth’s surface to rise.